Born To Read

 

 

 

Ages and Stages



Birth to Three Months

Developmental Characteristics:

Can distinguish between sharp, visual, primary colors and black and white
Knows primary caregiver's voice and can distinguish it from all other voices
Attracted to faces and to things that move
Attracted to rhythmic language and music

Implications for Book Sharing and Activities:

Books should be sturdy cardboard with rounded edges, durable, washable, and can be chewed on
Colors should be bright with definite contrasts between light and dark
Avoid books with more than idea or concept on a page or have a lot of text
Share Mother Goose rhymes
Play music (not just children's songs) and sing songs

Three to Six Months

Developmental Characteristics:

Want to touch humans and objects they can reach
By five months, want to grasp objects, hold and release them
Can hold small objects, such as books
Plays with sounds
Will smile and laugh
Able to kick legs and roll over

Implications for Book Sharing and Activities:

Use point and name books to introduce names of familiar items
Use books with textures that can be touched and cloth books
Avoid books with more than idea or concept on a page or have a lot of text
Repetition is important
Introduce simple finger/hand rhymes, toe/foot rhymes, tickle/touch rhymes, and bouncing rhymes
May use rattle toys during the playing of music in your program

Six to Nine Months

Developmental Characteristics:

Begins to see as well as an adult
Can sit with support
Will throw objects
Knows name
Babbling sounds like real speech
Vocalizes to get attention

Implications for Book Sharing and Activities:

Incorporate child's name into rhymes and songs as often as possible
Can use books that use colors other than primary colors
Repetition is important
Avoid books with more than idea or concept on a page or have a lot of text

Nine to Twelve Months

Developmental Characteristics:

Starts to creep and crawl
Begins to pull up
May begin to walk
Understands many simple words and directions
Likes to imitate words and sounds (such as animal sounds)
May be able to say a few simple words
Knows and delights in songs and rhymes that have been repeated often
Develops the beginnings of fine motor skills
Can clap hands, wave hello/goodbye, and make a fist

Implications for Book Sharing and Activities:

Finger/hand rhymes take on more significance
Begin to ask child to do some of the simple motions in finger/hand rhymes
Incorporate books and rhymes with sounds that can be easily imitated

Avoid books with more than idea or concept on a page or have a lot of text

Twelve to Eighteen Months

Developmental Characteristics:

Begins to walk
Curious about other children
Prefers to be around familiar people and/or objects
Basic words - one or more body parts can be named
Telegraphic speech
First sentences of one and two words; important content words
Simple memory
Fine motor skills are tuned - can stack block
Child begins to walk
Child can turn pages of a book
Moving or swaying to music is common

Implications for Book Sharing and Activities:

Able to name familiar objects in point and name books to which caregiver points
B
ooks that show other children doing familiar things are important (such as playing, going to the store)
Introduce manipulative books, such as flap books or books with holes
Use simple hand, feet and finger games that the child can do alone such as Peek-a-Boo and Pat-a-Cake
Continue to use different types of music, rhythm, and rhymes
Repetition continues to be important


Born To Read Home | Youth Services Home | Nassau Library System |

This website was funded in part by Federal Library Services and Technology Act funds, awarded to The New York State Library by the Federal Institute of Museum and Library Services.
The content on this page is provided by the Nassau Library System, Youth Services Department,

The address of this page is http://www.nassaulibrary.org/childrens/btr.htm
Last updated:September 4, 2002
Please feel free to send comments and suggestions.